Category Archives: Sitcoms

Fall TV 2017 – Returning Shows

If you’ve read any of my recent posts, you’ll know that I’m a big fan of TV comedy. So, it also won’t be a surprise that most of the shows that I watch regularly are sitcoms as well. With that in mind, I’m going to talk about the dramas first, to get it out of the way.

This Is Us

The only returning drama that I’ve seen this season has been last year’s big success story. In its second season, This Is Us continues to tell the story of three adult triplets, the loved ones in their lives, as well as flashing back to the story of their parents and the ups and downs of experiences that brought them all to their present lives. In particular, the past poses a big mystery around Jack (the father), who died some time between now and then. Most episodes tease us with hints about what happened, and the season 2 premiere is no exception. Meanwhile, we continue to learn about Jack and Rebecca’s big fight from season 1 and a few more surprises come out of that. Picking up some of the story twists at the end of last season, Kate pursues her singing career, but fights hard against her insecurities each step of the way. Randall pursues his wish to adopt a child, but learns that his wife Beth has a lot of misgivings. This show hits the ground running by pulling our heart strings and promises many more tear-jerking moments to come.

The Good Place

This fresh new sitcom ended last season with a doozy of a revelation that turned the entire series premise on its head. This season picks up almost immediately after, but then proceeds to keep going with change-ups to hilarious effect. This is the last time I’m going to protect last season’s spoilerific twist, so I’m just going to say that the original story about a selfish woman who mistakenly ends up in heaven has taken on a whole new set of issues. The four main resident characters are still fun to watch, especially Manny Jacinto as Jason Mendoza (a dim-witted former DJ from Florida), playing it as thick as ever. This is probably one of the most unique and fresh sitcoms around (except for perhaps Rick and Morty) and I enjoy not knowing where the story is going any more. I have faith that it will be surprising and fun.

Will & Grace

In contrast to the innovativeness of The Good Place, a couple of sitcoms are returning from the cancellation graveyard this year, and the first to show up is Will & Grace. As much as I enjoyed this show (it was one of my faves in its prime), I wasn’t quite sure what to expect when it came back 11 years after it left. The creators have tried to gloss over all the epilogue-ish stories that were tacked on in the series finale and return the main characters to the same apartment with the same interactions and clever banter. Unfortunately they still have a bit of work to do to get back there. The first episode seemed a bit preoccupied with proving that they are in 2017, tossing in gratuitous references to things like Grindr, and being “woke”. (And what is with Grace’s new employee? He does not fit in at all!) Since it was the 10-minute election-themed short episode that got the wheels turning on this revival, they naturally had to include a storyline about politics. However, it still ended in the kind of silly place (pillow fight in the Oval Office — intrigued?) that I did not love in many of the later episodes of the first run. Don’t get me wrong, I still love that the show is back, but I think they’ll need to step things up a bit, comedy-wise, if they want to hold our attention as the nostalgia fades.

The Mindy Project

I can’t decide whether I love or hate the quirky supporting characters, but I feel that they have been getting closer to the front of the stage with each year. Now they have played so much of a role that they’ve been pulling focus from Mindy’s (completely mis-matched) marriage to nurse Ben. Perhaps the writers just didn’t have many ideas to go with Mindy’s marriage, so they have now quickly tanked it and Mindy’s on her way to being divorced again. Either that or (since this is the last season of the show) they want to make room for Mindy’s first husband, Danny, to come back into the picture. Either way, I hope they get back to focusing on Mindy and her life rather than all the nutsos at the clinic. I think it will be a nice way to wrap up the series.

Speechless

The second season of this brash family comedy about JJ DiMeo, a teenager with cerebral palsy, and his no-nonsense family, already established its characters really well in the first season. Now it’s fun to see them deconstruct themselves while JJ’s away at camp and they evolve into different people in his absence. I’m hoping that this season will start to move on from setting up all the characters and start to focus on some interesting situations for the DiMeo family. One of my favourite episodes last season had the whole family stuck in a grocery store for the entire episode. I think the worst thing they can do now is to keep resetting the characters back to their same selves. At least middle-child Ray has got a sweet girlfriend now, and I hope there are more changes to come.

Brooklyn Nine-Nine

This cop sitcom does a great job of ending the season with some big situations. This season starts with Detectives Jake Peralta (Andy Samberg) and Rosa Diaz (Stephanie Beatriz) in prison after they were framed for a crime by a corrupt lieutenant at the end of last season. It usually takes a few episodes for things to go back to normal, so the first episode still has Jake in jail. His cellmate is a cannibal murderer who eats children, so that’s a bit of a comedic misfire, but the characters on this show still make a wonderful ensemble and I’m looking forward to things moving back to the precinct when they figure out how to get Jake and Rosa back. At least they need to do that before this year’s Halloween heist competition episode rolls around again.

Modern Family

As they have done in seasons-past, Modern Family picks up with the Dunphy-Pritchett family during their summer vacation, this year in a house-boat on the lake. For laughs they also throw in the recent solar eclipse as a plot point, but it’s just a way for the story to put the family in a confined space and close together before the kids have to go back to school. I’m hoping they continue to evolve this show after its many seasons, as most of the kids have moved into college-age and adulthood. The show is evolving into a grown-up sitcom and I’m not quite sure it knows how to be that. Either that or they have to start shining the spotlight on the clan’s youngest members: Lily (they have yet to give her any significant screen time) and Joe (I still don’t enjoy his scenes, especially not his deliberate and contrived “cuteness”). I love this series, but as many have said, it’s outlived its freshness and needs a bit of a reboot itself.

The Big Bang Theory

While being just as long in the tooth as Modern Family, I think Big Bang has been able to evolve itself a bit more over the years. Last season ended with a surprising marriage proposal from Sheldon to Amy, and even though I think there’s little doubt about the answer, it’s a little exciting to see where this change will take the show. Despite Penny and Leonard’s marriage being less of a shake-up than it might have been, I have high hopes for what Shamy-engaged will do. Along with the proposal hubbub, another big surprise came as Bernadette found herself pregnant again. With all the growing up and changes coming to this group of friends, I really hope that means that Leonard, Penny, and Raj will also get some meaty life/character events as well. I’m a bit tired of the joke of Penny divorcing Leonard and poor Raj’s continued failure in love (even though he’s had some pretty nice girlfriends so far).

American Housewife

Another family sitcom that I picked up last season: I enjoy the no-nonsense mom that Katie Otto is (played by Katy Mixon). I also like the son, Oliver, who’s basically a pre-pubescent Alex Keaton (from Family Ties). A lot of the emphasis on the show has been about how Katie doesn’t fit in with the rich moms of Westport, Connecticut with their fitness and pretension. However, in the premiere, Katie has a realization that she’s being too judgmental and has a mea culpa moment with the PTA, landing her the dreaded job of organizing the school’s spring gala. I think this is a great way to keep her looped in with the school, but I hope the other moms don’t remain so stereotypical this season. I loved it when Katie developed a couple of nemesis moms last season. Let’s bring them back!

Kim’s Convenience

I have a warm feeling for this series about a Toronto convenience store owner and his family, and I’m glad that it’s back again for more episodes in the life of the Kims. The first season started with a bit too much of that Canadian politically-correct humour and faux-progressiveness. I think the show really shone when it focused on the family and their interactions and their story. The second season began with daughter Janet’s attempt to move out, but it was not as easy as it initially seemed. I hope this change will bring a nice new element to the family dynamic. Similarly, I hope there is more opportunity for Mr. Kim and his son Jung to encounter each other and make some progress towards reconciliation. Their estrangement has made for an interesting thread throughout episodes so far, but it’s nice that there have been a few brief moments that show that hope is far from lost between father and son. There is potential for Kim’s Convenience to grow beyond its sitcom start and rediscover some of the dramatic depth of its origins on the stage.

Fuller House

Now that I’ve picked up so many sitcoms to watch, I’m not really sure why I still keep watching this show. I was not a fan of the first series, so it’s not for the many call-backs to the original family classic. This latest season (which I essentially binge-watched over a single weekend — Curse you, Netflix!) continues with the same antics and cutesy family plots of the first two seasons. The characters are generally likeable enough, but the silliness has been amped up as they prepare for the wedding of Steve and CJ. The midseason finale had a big predictable cliffhanger as DJ inadvertently admitted that she had chosen Steve as her boyfriend when she had a sleep mask on, meanwhile, her actual boyfriend Matt was getting ready to propose to her on the other side of the plane. Oh Mylanta!

So, thanks for sticking with me through all those sitcoms. As you can tell, the season is off to a roaring start with the comedies. Hopefully there will be a few new ones that prove themselves worthy of returning and being picked up as classics as well. Who knows, they might even go long enough to be cancelled and revived a decade later! Anyway, stay tuned for more Fall TV summaries.

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Fall TV 2017 – New Shows

After a pretty unexciting summer movie season, it would have been nice to come home to some exciting new shows this fall. Alas, so far some aren’t too promising despite a strong pedigree, and others are downright terrible. Good thing there are still a number of returning shows to keep us satisfied (I’ll get to those later.)

Young Sheldon

I don’t quite understand why this show got made. Compared to its parent-series, The Big Bang Theory, this prequel show about the childhood of its main character, Sheldon Cooper, is a lot more ordinary. From The Wonder Years, to Malcolm in the Middle, to Everybody Hates Chris, to Fresh Off the Boat, there are so many shows as flashbacks to the story of a boy growing up in a normal-yet-quirky family. The narration from older/future Sheldon (still voiced by Jim Parsons) reminds us that he’ll one day be a super-nerd, but for now, he’s just a regular dweeby kid who’s been bumped ahead a few grades. Sheldon doesn’t know how to behave around normal people even as an adult on Big Bang Theory, so obviously he’s hopeless as a child. Are we just going to see him get bullied and ostracized for the entire series of Young Sheldon? The first episode showed us Sheldon’s family, but the only one who seemed interesting was the younger version of Sheldon’s mom. There were some character moments between Sheldon and his father, but considering that we know he’s going to leave his family, every moment of connection between father and son is bittersweet. Even with that potential for drama, this show is not a dramedy. It’s pure sitcom, and (despite its already having received a full season order) so far it doesn’t seem like a very interesting one.

The Good Doctor

This show kind of echoes some of the themes of Young Sheldon, but it’s about Freddie Highmore (last seen playing pre-psycho Norman on Bates Motel) as a young surgeon who’s also an autistic savant. Like Sheldon, Shaun Murphy knows way too much stuff (plus he has a super-human ability to diagnose a suffering person’s medical ailments), and people just don’t understand him. In the first episode he tries to save a young boy in the airport, but gets tackled by security when he grabs a knife from the confiscated-articles box. No one (except the audience) sees his genius. As much as I enjoy Highmore in the role, and he makes a good addition to the long line of medical miracle-workers celebrated on-screen, I don’t really know how this show is going to go. His character seems a bit like an alien who floats through the hospital intervening with his super-human medical abilities. Hopefully he will develop genuine relationships with his colleagues and become a more organic part of the hospital, but that has not happened yet.

The Orville

The Seth MacFarlane sci-fi show came into the mix with a confusing premise. It is meant to be a space-ship series with a positive, upbeat outlook, similar to the many Star Trek shows that have come before (especially Star Trek: The Next Generation). What was not clear was whether this show would be a parody of Star Trek, or a copy. The show got an early start, so now that we’ve seen four episodes, we know it’s the latter. While the involvement of MacFarlane (creator of Family Guy) means that there is bound to be some humour, it is clear that the show is meant to be a replica of Star Trek — from the uniforms, to the ships, to the crew, even the music — all make you feel like you’re watching Trek. Unfortunately two things make The Orville a pale copy: the writing is incredibly weak; and the humour is limp. If the show intended to follow in Trek’s footsteps, its writers needed to develop a much better understanding of sci-fi and what has gone on before. Most of the episodes so far have been variations on Trek (and even Stargate) stories, but not taking itself seriously enough to fully develop the ideas and themes of each. The worst example is an episode where a crew member from a single-sex race faces a storm of controversy when he tries to follow his culture by reassigning his female child to conform with his race’s male gender. Many of the characters rant about how barbaric this surgery is on an infant, and how women are just as good as men (and one scene even uses the stupidity of the ship’s male pilot as proof that males are not superior). The arguments are weak and poorly thought-out both as political discourse and as science fictional allegory. Similarly, the jokes also show ridiculous lack of thought. Almost every joke shows that MacFarlane’s character (Captain Ed Mercer) is really just a displaced 21st century guy in a show set 400 years in the future. No one would laugh at those comments: not then, and not even now. It’s as if a character on Big Bang Theory was making jokes that a Shakespearean audience would find funny. The humour is so anachronistic that it seems pasted on. This show is clearly MacFarlane’s vanity project and I don’t see how it can possibly survive, especially when compared to…

Star Trek: Discovery

Finally, after over a decade, Star Trek returns to the small screen, and not a moment too soon. Despite the fact that this series is set in a time before the original series (and despite the fact that I am tired of Trek creators going back to that period), everything looks and feels very modern and futuristic. The production values of the two-part opening episode is movie-quality stuff (complete with a few unwanted Abrams-style lens flares). The story features Michael Burnham, a first officer rather than a captain, as she tries to save her crew and captain from an encounter with the Klingons (remember, in this time period Klingons are enemies to the Federation). Rather than the episodic exploratory encounters of Star Trek and The Next Generation, so far this new series leans more towards action and the power politics of space (similar to Deep Space Nine, or even The Expanse). The premiere episode is very much like a movie and sets up Burnham’s story, rather than how episodes of the show will go. It’s definitely less traditional than previous Trek, but it could be a really exciting new direction for the franchise. I’m a little disappointed in how they’ve set up the Klingons again as a kind of enemy-race (It always seems unrealistic that an entire space-faring species would have the same motives and agendas). I hope things will become more nuanced and complex as the series progresses. Nevertheless, even out the gate, Discovery flies rings around The Orville.

Marvel’s The Inhumans

Oh, the (in)humanity! This is perhaps one of the most hyped sci-fi shows of the fall. Many people are already familiar with the Inhumans from recent comic book events and series featuring these characters. As well, this show’s pilot episodes were shot in IMAX format so they could premiere on the big big screen before its tv debut. I’m not sure why it seemed that Marvel Entertainment spent so little effort (and obviously not enough money) on the show, but it definitely shows. From inferior scripts, to second-rate acting, to ridiculous costumes and terrible CGI effects, this show has so much going wrong with it that it’s doomed to failure. The story of a race of super-humans living on the moon who are given fabulous mutations as they reach adolescence has a lot of sci-fi potential. Unfortunately this show does not yet live up to any of it. Black Bolt and Medusa are the king and queen of the Inhumans and when Black Bolt’s brother Maximus stages a coup (with only about a dozen soldiers), the rest of the royal family escape to Hawaii, where they are scattered as fishes out of water and need to make their way to each other. Much has already been written about the poor CGI effects, most notable being Medusa’s prehensile hair, which in comic books is huge and strong like gigantic tentacles that she uses to grip and fight enemies, but on the show they’re poorly animated strands that she wraps around Maximus’s throat or pushes him up against the wall. What makes it look worse is that her hair is so short that it everything she does with her hair could just as easily be done with her hands. Then as part of the coup they even shave her hair off (thus saving the CGI dollars)! There’s also a giant bulldog named Lockjaw, which is the royal family pet, that can teleport anyone anywhere. When he does, the CGI looks like he’s being sucked off the edge of the screen, or like when I minimize the apps on my Mac. However, all the poor production values would be liveable if the script and acting were good. Unfortunately they are not.

Me, Myself and I

Finally, I had not originally planned to watch this show, but the premise caught my eye. The triple title describes the format where we get to watch the story of the main character, inventor Alex Riley, in three periods of life: childhood, middle age, and retirement. It’s a dramedy starring SNL comedian Bobby Moynihan as the middle-aged Riley, John Laroquette as the elderly version, and newcomer Jack Dylan Grazer as the kid version. The formula seems to bring the three story parts together along a loose thematic thread, but even without that connection, the stories are nice little vignettes. So far, I can see how the show will be charming and uplifting. It’s like a lighter version of This Is Us, without the big-three-fold drama and the looming death of the father. If they keep drawing connections between the three time periods, things may start to seem too unnaturally parallel, but this is still a potentially enjoyable show until then.

That’s all the new shows that I’ve seen this season so far, but sadly there are only a handful more to come. This year the networks have concentrated their premieres all within a short period (which is how I like it), but that means I don’t have time to cover them all at once. I’ll be back tomorrow with Returning Shows, and then come back again to close out the remaining premieres that follow. Later!

2017 Summer of Sitcom Binge-watching

From my lack of reviews over the summer, it may be obvious that I, like critics and audiences everywhere, think this was the worst summer movie season ever. I only got out to a couple of movies in the theatre, so what have I been doing to satisfy my pop-cultural cravings over the summer? I’ve been couch-potatoing: binge-watching a number of sitcoms (many on Netflix). Some of them I never thought I’d like, or gave up the first time around. Giving them a second chance, they aren’t half bad. So now I’m going to provide a quick recap of ten (count’em, 10) of these shows, so you can decide whether or not to give these shows a viewing.

1. Grace and Frankie

This is probably the biggest surprise on the list. Jane Fonda and Lily Tomlin play two women in their 70s who become unlikely best friends after their husbands come-out and become lovers. I could not relate too much with the situation behind this comedy, but an excellent cast, some pretty good writing, and a funny-yet-heartfelt tone really won me over. Fonda plays Grace, a serious, sophisticated business woman who ran a cosmetics company and needs her life to be perfect. On the other side, Tomlin plays Frankie, an unpredictable free spirit and hippie who teaches art classes to convicts and named her sons Coyote and Nwabudike. At first, they were mortal enemies, forced to live together in a shared beach house after their husbands moved in together, but they eventually learned to tolerate and even depend on each other. To me, the show’s focus on their offbeat-yet-solid friendship is what got me hooked in spite of all the stuff about seniors and their sex-lives (which definitely did not). (4 out of 5)

2. The Ranch

Just like Grace and Frankie, I’d seen promotions for The Ranch all around Netflix, as one of its originals, but I had no intention of giving it a shot. Ashton Kutcher does not really headline my kind of entertainment. I thought he was pretty funny on That 70s Show as Kelso, but his stupid goofballs are not the kind of characters that I like. When he was joined by fellow 70s alum Danny Masterson on The Ranch in a show about rancher brothers who struggle with their family, and with relationships (often due to their inability to express their feelings). These elements were all warning flags for me to stay away. However, once I tried on Kutcher, as a pro footballer who returns to his family’s cattle ranch after his career ends, I actually found myself interested in what happened to him and his family. Masterson plays his brother and in true Prodigal Son fashion, Kutcher’s character’s return stirs up a tornado of resentment from Masterson’s character who stayed behind. Topping off the triangle of stolid masculinity is their father, played really well by Sam Shepherd, who can definitely work a stone-faced glare. Again, the actors do a pretty good job (Kutcher inhabits his character well), and the show is surprisingly heartfelt about finding humour despite the financial hardships that the family faces. One weak point is Debra Winger as the mom: she’s kind of stiff and as a character, she doesn’t fit too well into the ensemble. (3.5 out of 5)

3. Life In Pieces

When it first premiered (it’s not a Netflix original), I dismissed Life In Pieces as a Modern Family knock-off. It kind of is, but that doesn’t mean it can’t be enjoyable and diverting. Also about a family of adults (including grandparents, as well as grandchildren) who spend an unusually large amount of time together, there’s a very similar feel to this show. On Life In Pieces, there are three segments per episode (hence the title) and each segment brings together different members of this extended family in different situations. It’s taking the concept of “situation comedy” and putting an organized framework around it. The characters vary in likeability and quirkiness. I can’t say there are any that I am a total fan of (though maybe Colin Hanks as a hapless new dad comes close), which means I don’t have a character who anchors me to the show. It’s very take-or-leave for me, even after having watched the entire first season plus a bit of the second. (3 out of 5)

4. No Tomorrow

Another show that I gave up on originally, this one features Joshua Sasse as Xavier, an eccentric, free-spirited guy who is convinced that the world will end in eight months so he wants to live what remains of his life to the full. He meets up with Evie, who falls for Xavier’s good looks as well as his cavalier spirit. He ignites the risk-taker in her own relatively buttoned-up life (as a middle-manager for a Costco-style chain store). The situations for comedy are triggered by the two working through their doomsday bucket lists, as well as from the odd ensemble of friends and co-workers in Evie’s life. This show was alright, and it actually had a bit of an interesting background story arc around Xavier trying to get the message out about the imminent disaster. However, I did not really fall for the side characters, who are just oddly-mediocre. As for the main couple, I believe their story would have played out completely differently if they weren’t both so attractive, which just makes this show even more ridiculous. I enjoyed the episodes well enough, but if the show had not been cancelled already after its first season, I probably would have stopped watching. (3 out of 5)

5. About A Boy

Do you know of the Nick Hornby book of the same name, which spawned the original Hugh Grant movie; or that the movie also got turned into a TV series? Well, it lasted two seasons from 2014 to 2015, and presented the story of Will Freeman, a songwriter and bachelor, living off royalties from a megahit single and a roguish charm with women. However, when a quirky, hippie mother (played by Minnie Driver) and her young son move in next door, their lives start to intrude on each other and eventually bond and blend. I did watch the first episode of this show back when it aired, but immature man-child characters are one type that I really don’t like, so I stopped watching. However, as I stuck with the show this time around, I got to see a really crazy-yet-healthy relationship grow between Will and the neighbour kid (Marcus). As a bro/surrogate dad to Marcus, Will’s character really developed over two seasons. I enjoyed how they brought out the best in each other. It eventually became a plot point how close the two guys became, but I’m glad that the show leaned into that kind of unique relationship. It’s a bit too bad that the show ended, because I think I might have continued to watch it. (3.5 out of 5)

6. The Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt

I didn’t discover this series this summer. In fact, I had really enjoyed previous seasons when they first appeared on Netflix. Unfortunately, my interest and enjoyment of the series has decreased each season. The show about a young woman who had been rescued from a doomsday cult, trying to find a life for herself in New York, was an extreme and humourous fish-out-of-water story in season one, and I kind of enjoyed the over-the-top supporting characters, including her flamboyantly gay roommate, oddly crotchety landlady, and strangely clueless, rich boss. After two seasons, I now find Kimmy (played by Ellie Kemper) unbearably naive — though it was funny before. I’m finding it hard to stomach roommate Titus’s ridiculous melodrama, and the rest of the stories and characters are just getting broader and broader. As the situations get more soap-opera melodramatic (Can you believe there’s actually a “remove the bandages” reveal for one character, who ends up looking like a totally different person?) I don’t know what to laugh at anymore. (3 out of 5)

7. Master of None

As another acclaimed Netflix original sitcom, Azziz Ansari’s labour of love, has gone the opposite direction in my estimation from Kimmy Schmidt. I watched the first half of Master of None season one and gave up, feeling very little connection to Ansari’s character Dev (a struggling actor trying to find love and success in New York), and I didn’t like his friends much. (I did, however, love the acclaimed episode connecting a couple of the character to the stories of their immigrant parents.) Fortunately, good buzz caused me to retry the show, and I was really glad that I did. When Dev went to Italy to study pasta-making in season two, it transformed the show. The writing seemed to get a bump up in sophistication, while still remaining focused on Dev’s successes and failures in life. I enjoyed the characters much more in the second season, and the stories were richer and more satisfying (a high point was the Thanksgiving episode that not only traced Dev’s relationship with one of his best friends, Denise, since their childhood, it also showed Denise’s family come to terms with her being a lesbian). On top of all that, Alessandra Mastronardi is beautifully-flawed perfection as Dev’s friend/girlfriend Francesca; and the season ends with a subtle, nuanced, will-they-won’t-they cliffhanger. I can’t wait for the next season! (4.5 out of 5)

8. Friends From College

First off, this show looks like a comedy from the advertising, but it is not one. It’s a drama (with some humourous elements) about a group of friends and acquaintances from college whose group is potentially reforming when one couple moves back to New York. Keegan-Michael Key and Cobie Smulders play the pair in question, whose marriage is a bit shaky (wife does not know that husband has been having a long-distance affair with another one of their friends from college all these years, but now that they’re going to be co-located, it might just come up). I think the title of the series is meant to be ironic, or at least point a finger at the idea (which gets a lot of play on TV) that a group of friends from college will be friends forever. These characters act friendly and tease out the relationships that reach back into the past, but they are not very good to each other. The show reaches an extreme climax in the season finale as revelations lead to confrontations and a nice car is ruined. I didn’t find this show fun to watch, but I did want to see how these relationships all played out. Still haven’t decided on season 2 (3.5 out of 5)

9. Bajillion Dollar Propertie$

Coming from Seeso, a streaming channel that you’ve probably never heard of, this show lampoons the many real-estate based reality-TV shows. It focuses on a single top-end real estate firm in California, whose agents are all clawing their way to the top. While the characters are all pretty broad, they play pretty well (especially when paired with one of many comedic guest stars as clients, including Nick Kroll, Jack McBrayer, Patton Oswalt, Randall Park, Andy Richter, Casey Wilson, Weird Al Yankovic, Rhys Darby, Bret McKenzie, and Sarah Silverman). The scene that convinced me to give the whole series a shot was one where Dan Ahdoot (who plays Amir Yaghoob, a very driven agent) tried to wrangle The Walking Dead‘s Steven Yeun as a spoiled rich kid who has gotten high with his friends in a home that Amir is trying to sell. The writing and tone is uneven, but if you enjoy poking fun at the excess that this kind of tv normally promotes, then this is a fun cartoon of a show. (3.5 out of 5)

10. Rick and Morty

Last, but definitely not least, is an animated comedy that I should have discovered a long time ago. It is tailor-made for sci-fi geeks such as myself and, for my money, contains the highest concentration of sci-fi ideas of any series currently active. Think of it as a cross between Futurama and Doctor Who. The title characters are Rick Sanchez (a hard-drinking, hard-partying, vulgar super-genius who can invent virtually anything) and his grandson Morty Smith (a semi-naive 14 year old brought along as a companion for his grandpa’s crazy inter-dimensional adventures). Though it’s an animated show, it is not really for kids. There is a lot of profanity and some pretty perverse and deviant ideas are tossed around left and right (I confess, I would have enjoyed less of that element). Armed with a portal gun that takes them to other places in the universe as well as alternate versions of reality, this show has everything from robots, space creatures, shrinking down to microscopic, splintering of space-time, intergalactic talent competition, insectoid alien assassins, a planet of amazon women, and the list goes on ad infinitum. This show has so many details that fanboys (and fangirls) pore endlessly over them to form fan theories, etc. On top of all the science fictional goodness, there is also an intense family backdrop. The rest of the family consists of Rick’s daughter, who is Morty’s mother, Morty’s older sister Summer, and their father Jerry. The family is far from perfect and they struggle with lack of communication, lack of mutual respect, lack of affection, lack of acceptance, which may be typical in some family dramas that are trying to depict the challenges of actual family life, but on this show, it’s all part of a dark sense of humour that underlies the stories. I love that this show does not shy away from the tough stuff, and also that it does not hold back on the sci-fi. I’m currently rewatching the series (even as the third season has already begun) to try to catch as many of the details as I can. (4.5 out of 5)

2017 Fall TV Preview

Netflix and streaming keeps changing our idea of TV seasons, when they begin and end, still we recently concluded the 2016-17 network TV season. This is also the time when the networks give us a peek at their fall schedules. For myself, there weren’t any tough cancellations — even one show that I would have kind of missed, the time-travel drama Timeless, was miraculously saved for the fall. However, I will miss the Tim Allen sitcom Last Man Standing, which I got into by binge-watching on Netflix and has now been cancelled after six seasons. It’s the TV circle of life: cancelled shows make room for new shows. This coming fall season, I’m most excited for new shows on Fox and ABC, while NBC, CBS, and The CW are barely registering on my radar. Let’s get into the details:

Fox

I’m most excited about Fox because they are clearly having fun with genre shows. A new show that I don’t plan on checking out is The Resident: one more medical drama, this one features Matt Czuchry (from The Good Wife) as a hotshot resident who butts heads with Bruce Greenwood, the unethical “veteran” doctor. I don’t feel that Czuchry has much charisma, so I don’t know why they keep trying to make him into a young hotshot.

Another bad first impression is on LA to Vegas, a comedy about a plane cabin crew with Dylan McDermott as the captain (Why do they keep trying to make him funny? He isn’t.) The humour is the semi-lowbrow kind that I don’t like. Pass on both these shows.

The Gifted is a new series about some super-powered kids (don’t call them “X-Men” yet) who seem to be on the run. Amy Acker (yay!) and Stephen Moyer (meh!) star as the parents. This is supposedly set in the X-Universe, but I think none of the characters will be recognizable from the comics or films. In the trailer there’s a typically over-the-top bullying scene where a nerdy boy manifests his mutant powers, which makes me hope that this show will be a little more sophisticated. So far it looks like a cheap Heroes knock-off. Still, since it’s got that X pedigree, plus it’s produced by X-director Bryan Singer, I think there is some potential.

Most promising in my book are two genre-based comedies. The Orville is a terrible name, because it’s the name of a starship, for a show that is essentially Galaxy Quest: The Series. Seth MacFarlane gets in front of the camera to star as “The Orville”‘s hapless captain. Jon Favreau is one of the directors, along with other Star Trek notables like Brannon Braga, Robert D. MacNeill, and Jonathan Frakes. It looks pretty funny, and I’m a sucker for Trek humour, so I am looking forward to this one.

Ghosted is another sci-fi comedy, one that is more a send-up of The X-Files (which is itself returning for another season). Craig Robinson (from The Office) and Adam Scott (from Parks and Recreation) play an “odd couple” who get drafted by The Bureau Underground to investigate creepy supernatural phenomena. I am not sure what a weekly episode might look like (because like many trailers, this show plays a bit like a movie), nevertheless, they’ve got two great comedic leads, and Scott gets to be even more nerdy than usual. It’s going to be a riot.

ABC

So many new shows with potential on ABC this fall: The Crossing seems a few years too late to follow in Lost‘s footsteps, but it still tries to make a go at a high-concept premise with sci-fi overtones. The show seems to be about a group of about 50 people who wash ashore at a small coastal town. These people are not only from the future, but they have superhuman abilities as well. This show also reminds me of another series: The 4400. That series had a very challenging run. I hope this series ends up being something fresh and cool.

Deception takes a stage-magic-based storyline (like the movie Now You See Me) and combines it with the recent trend of “special guest” consultants for law enforcement (think Castle on the good end, or the more recent APB on the bad). A popular stage magician gets involved with the FBI to help them track down bad guys who are also using stage magic for heists and other crimes. I think this could be really fun, but unfortunately I don’t think the lead, played by Jack Cutmore-Scott (I don’t know him either), has even one-tenth of Nathan Fillion’s Castle charisma.

The Good Doctor is kind of a lame title (especially after The Good Wife was a much more meaningful title) for a series about a savant/brilliant young doctor (played by the wonderful Freddy Highmore) who also has some serious socio-psychological issues. I doubt I’ll watch this “House Jr.” series for long, but it could be good. I just hope the show doesn’t spend all its time justifying how a quirky genius is worth his weight in miracles, and that outsiders should be accepted.

The Gospel of Kevin is an odd show, starring Jason Ritter as a reformed screw-up who encounters a meteorite that allows him to see and talk to his guardian angel who helps him make his life meaningful (whew!). Ironically, Ritter got his start on the similarly themed series Joan of Arcadia a decade ago. I don’t think this show looks too interesting, but I might give it a chance.

Alex Inc. features Zach Braff (from Scrubs) as basically another version of all his characters: bungling-yet-lovable-and-well-meaning guy ends up starting a for-profit podcast about his own way to success in life (with his family). I’m a bit tired of Braff’s character, but I do like the inter-racial family (his wife is of East Indian descent).

For The People seems a bit cliche: another pretty young lawyer show, this time focusing on newbies to both the prosecution and the defense sides of the law. It doesn’t break new ground, but I’m a sucker for a good lawyer show.

Last but not least, the trend of reviving long-cancelled shows continues with Roseanne‘s return to the airwaves. All of these have potential, so we’ll see.

The CW

The network renewed almost all their shows, so there’s not much room on The CW’s schedule for new ones. Life Sentence, starring the always-cute Lucy Hale (from Pretty Little Liars) as a young woman reinventing her life after finding out she is no longer dying of cancer, is not startlingly original (I feel like it’s looking for some of that This Is Us drama-love), but it has potential. A lot depends on whether the other characters and storylines engage with the viewers.

There’s Valor, which involves a cover-up and pretty characters making melodrama decisions against a military backdrop — it seems inspired by Quantico. The whole story seems to be told in the trailer — not sure how this will become an actual series.

Another new DC superhero show (in addition to the other four) called Black Lightning. Seems pretty similar to the other shows, except it’s got a bit more of that local-neighbourhood vibe (similar to Marvel’s Daredevil). Unfortunately I’m a bit burnt out on superhero shows, so I don’t think I’ll watch it.

Finally, The CW seems to be heading for an epic fail with the reboot of seminal 80s soap Dynasty. I was a late-coming fan of the original, but this version seems ridiculous. Grant Show is super-miscast as patriarch Blake Carrington, not only lacking John Forsythe’s sense of masculine elegance but also lacking any believability as a powerful billionaire. This just seems like one of many CW soaps and squanders the Dynasty brand in a big way.

NBC

On one hand, NBC deserves kudos for resurrecting Will and Grace, one of my favourite sitcoms, with the original cast intact. On the other hand, there are virtually no new shows of note. The Brave is another of many military shows which follows Quantico so much that it actually cast one of the actors from that show. Whatever.

CBS

Last and least, CBS tries to catch ten-season-old lightning in a bottle by spinning off the character of Big Bang Theory‘s Sheldon Cooper into his own show — but as a child living in Texas. The trailer has the feel of a Malcolm in the Middle, with all its white-trash caricatures. Unfortunately, the writing and acting both seem terrible and the characters seem incredibly flat. It’s a bad sign if the best part is the voiceover narration from Jim Parsons as adult Sheldon. Mark Feuerstein has a new sitcom called 9JKL about living next door to his parents and his brother. I don’t know if it looks any good, but the parents are played by Elliott Gould and Linda Lavin, so at least there’s that. Oh, and David Boreanaz stars in another military show called Seal Team. (I would say more about the CBS shows, but ridiculously they block the trailers from being viewed in other countries, such as Canada. Nice!)

Bonus: CBS All Access

I don’t want to jinx anything, since I previewed this series in last year’s post, but Star Trek: Discovery is coming some time within the next year — they’ve released a trailer and everything! Given the degree to which it’s already been delayed, I don’t doubt that it might be delayed further, but we Trekkers still hold out hope. Let’s also hope that the show is something special — can’t quite tell from the trailer.

More Midseason TV 2017

Didn’t I tell you that there’s a lot of TV to watch? It’s been a month since I last posted about the new shows in January and there have been a whole slew more. TV programmers seem to take more chances on the weird stuff (that’s the sci-fi/fantasy genre to us fans) in midseason, so that means there’s a lot that suits my taste. Let’s jump right in with the good and the bad.

legion-0017Legion

Starting off with a wild card, Legion is the black sheep of the superhero genre (even more than Deadpool). Based on a character from the X-Men family, it’s the story of David Haller, the illegitimate son of Professor X himself. David is heir to vast psychic abilities (way stronger than ol’ pops), but mental illness (aka schizophrenia) puts him a bit out of control. The series (featuring Downton Abbey‘s Dan Stevens in the title role) doesn’t connect directly to much of the comic book backstory. In the show, David is being treated for schizophrenia in order to control his vast mental powers, but there isn’t much of the rest of the Marvel Comics mutant storyline that remains. Still, it’s a very retro, trippy experience. The show plays around with non-linear storytelling in a way that it’s a challenge to follow what scenes are past, present, or imaginary/delusional. There is a very heavy psychological bent to the script and the audience is struggling along with David’s mental anguish. Nevertheless, it’s far from depressing (partially thanks to Parks and Recreation‘s Aubrey Plaza as David’s asylum-buddy). If this doesn’t sound appealing, and you’re more interested in super-powered action, I promise that by the end of the first episode, there’s a big payoff. Plus, by the second episode, we meet a bunch more characters with abilities that make you feel more like you’re hanging with the X-Men (though why the show does not use any Marvel brand-named characters is beyond me — perhaps it’s because the script-writers wanted to work with different abilities than what’s already on the Marvel roster). In any case, Legion is a very good, grown-up take on the super-powered TV series. I’m excited to follow where it leads.

powerless-dc-comicsPowerless

For an almost opposite experience of the super-hero world, I give you DC’s Powerless. Instead of adding to the variety by way of a head-trip, DC has decided to hit the funny-bone with this workplace comedy set in the DC super-hero universe. Vanessa Hudgens plays Emily, a young manager who moves to Charm City (I think they just made that one up) to take over as director of an R&D division at Wayne Security. The show reminds me a lot of a series called Better Off Ted, which also poked fun at corporate life in an R&D department, but at Wayne Security they invent products to help people cope in a world full of supers (like Joker anti-venom or a wrist device that lights up when it detects a super-villain nearby). Part of the humour of this show is targeted at nerds like me who appreciate the fun had at the expense of comic-book cliches, but the other part is classic workplace humour: fitting in with a new team, pleasing an unworthy boss, etc. This division of Wayne Industries is headed by Van Wayne (played by Firefly‘s nerd-pleasing Alan Tudyk) who is constantly trying to get the attention and kudos of his much more successful cousin, Bruce (who he likes to call “B-Dubs”), and get reassigned to the Gotham office. The cast includes another nerd-friendly name, Danny Pudi from Community, who is actually less weird than he was as Abed. The first couple of episodes were OK, but they had me wondering if they would get the balance right between super-parody and office-comedy. At first they were really leaning on the latter, but by episode 3, I think they really hit the sweet-spot when the team suspected a co-worker of secretly being a super-hero, and when Emily and Van worked on landing a contract with the Atlanteans (who think of Aquaman as a celebrity). This nerd-bait show has a lot of potential and I am laughing more each week. Now if only they’d bring more actual DC characters into the show (even if it’s just for cameos). I’m a little disappointed by all the name-drops when the onscreen supers we actually see in the background are mostly new, poorly-made-up characters. Give me the real DC Comics B-list! Surely they can’t all be reserved for the movies and The CW.

riverdale-header3Riverdale

Another comic book show, though one of a completely different stripe, Riverdale takes the classic Archie comic book series and reinvents it as a moody teen drama that is part Twin Peaks, part 90210 (or The OC or Gossip Girl, even Scream Queens, or plug in your own teen soap). The show playfully reimagines familiar characters such as Archie, the red-headed golden-boy athlete-musician; Betty and Veronica, the blonde-brunette archetype girlfriends; and Jughead, who’s gone from lovable, goofy friend to offbeat, surly hipster. I was not much of an Archie fan, so I don’t know how far afield the TV show has gone, but I suspect that there were no murders in the comics. Taking a cue for Twin Peaks, the show starts out with a murder mystery around who killed Jason Blossom, one half of the town’s spoiled, rich twin elite with his sister Cheryl. The mysteries deepen as secrets all around town start slipping out, most notably Archie’s jail-bait relationship with music teacher Ms. Grundy (who don’t look anything like the old white-haired dowager from the comics I’ve seen)! In typical teen soap style, the kids are all great looking, worldly, socially-savvy, and have the clever way-with-words that a teenager only gets from a staff of intentionally hip screenwriters. All the contrivances aside, I enjoy this kind of a show for all its scandalous twists and playful naughtiness. For those of you who remember its early days, enjoy Riverdale like you enjoyed Twin Peaks before all the bizarre, creepy insanity got the better of it.

apb-dix6jbe2yts-market_maxresAPB

This show had a potentially clever premise that made room for comment on the politics of law enforcement and tech-based business and industry, even while delivering some action-packed police drama. Unfortunately APB is really missing some well-thought-out writing to make that all come together. The show is about a tech billionaire who buys a police precinct in order to get justice after his friend is killed during a corner store robbery. Justin Kirk plays Gideon Reeves, the ego-driven mogul whose R&D division apparently invented all kinds of technology perfect for equipping a police force, including: fast armoured cars, remote-controlled drones, a tracking/mapping system that puts 24‘s CTU to shame, and a smartphone app to keep in touch with the locals. Part of me wishes that the creators of the show would have gone further with the technology, coming up with insanely advanced tech for these officers. As it is, what they’ve got seems only mildly interesting (despite the fact that this CEO seems to be spending all his time tinkering with the equipment himself each week to invent something new). It’s not very futuristic and it doesn’t seem like anyone’s given serious speculative thought to what kind of tech innovations would be useful for a real-world police force. Similarly, if a captain of the tech industry was throwing his corporate might behind a police precinct, there would be armies of staff and infrastructure deployed to make everything work. Instead Reeves himself and his capable data-scientist Ada seem to be the only ones available to help (though now they’ve brought a wrestler-turned-engineer/scientist into the mix). As a show, all success seems to be riding on the back of Justin Kirk, since his cocky maverick is the only interesting character on the show. There’s also Natalie Martinez as Murphy, a supposedly veteran beat cop who Reeves takes under his wing. Sadly she is already tiresome, the way she is always showing Reeves some kind of real-life truth that he can’t buy with all his tech-mogul success. Add to that, they’ve decided to make the mayor and his office into a kind of villain and nemesis to Reeves and his new project. Argh! I hate squandered potential and this show reeks of it. I wouldn’t give much for its chances.

drew-barrymore-timothy-olyphant-santa-clarita-dietThe Santa Clarita Diet

If you thought Netflix was slowing down, think again. In addition to carrying Riverdale (at least in Canada), it also recently debuted an odd little series featuring Drew Barrymore as a wife, mom, realtor, and kind of a zombie. I wasn’t going to watch it at first because I really hate zombies and most shows and movies about the walking dead, but when I heard that this was a more Desperate Housewives kind of take on the sub-genre, I was intrigued. When one day Sheila doesn’t feel quite well and ends up projectile-vomiting gallons (I mean, they really overdid this part) of disgusting stuff, she finds that she loses her pulse but gains a very positive outlook. You would not think that hilarity would ensue, but as a kind of dark satire of suburban life, the combination is actually pretty fun. I would still love to fast-forward those parts where Sheila chows down on bloody body parts — so much blood and gore — but otherwise I’m enjoying things. Barrymore is alright in a relatively manic role, but it’s really Timothy Olyphant who shines. Joel is taking it all in stride as a supportive husband on the outside, while underneath you know that he’s just holding on to his wits by his fingertips. One of my favourite lines comes from him when they have trouble trying to think of justifiably expendable candidates to kill to feed Shiela’s hunger: “Where are all the single, young Hitlers?” Joel wonders. Absurd, right? Also, their daughter Abby’s disturbing nonchalance about all this (including the apparent victims of her mother’s hunger), and the nerdy neighbour boy who exchanges sci-fi knowledge about the undead for a chance to spend time with Abby, are a hoot as well. I have no idea how far a show like this can go, but if anything is fodder for this kind of parody it’s suburbia. Am I right?

24legacy124 Legacy

I’m happy that there are new shows coming out that are truly new (i.e. not a reinvention or reboot) but do we have room in our hearts for one more attempt at making 24 work? The last time we had Jack Bauer running around, 24: Live Another Day took the franchise global but still lost my interest part way through the shortened series. I think I was just tired of seeing Kiefer Sutherland do the same things, the same plots, the same scenes again. It was starting to feel like self-parody. This new series seems to think that casting a new lead will solve things. Corey Hawkins plays Eric Carter, a former army-ranger who is targeted by a terrorist group after all his former army squad-mates are killed. Helping out Hawkins via his earpiece is Miranda Otto as Rebecca Ingram, the former head of CTU. Once again the clock is ticking, forcing everyone to take very desperate and drastic steps in order to save the day. Jack Bauer’s kind of “there’s no time” decision making is definitely at the heart of Carter’s choices as well. When he needs to come up with two million dollars to ransom a memory stick from his crazy former squad-mate, more logical courses of action give way to a plan to get arrested in order to steal the cash from a secure police evidence facility — Really? No better plans than that? — there’s no time! In the background, other plots are also in motion. CTU is once again a dimly-lit hotbed of potential moles and leaks. Plus, Ingram’s husband (played by Jimmy Smits) is running for office, so there’s that whole political angle coming out. I have to say that seeing the same kind of stories and plots through a new batch of characters does help blow out some of the cobwebs. Muslim terrorists again? Sleeper cells again? Maybe a new story would have helped even more — but there’s no time!

theexpanse_bobbie_draper_03b-0The Expanse

Coming back for its second season is a show that held the hopes of many a Battlestar Galactica fan, that complex, sophisticated sci-fi would actually entertain. I think this show’s still got a way to go to prove that, but after watching several season one episodes twice to get there, I think I am following the story to some degree. Last season saw former Star Helix detective Miller (played by Thomas Jane) and former ship captain Holden (played by Steven Strait) discovering that events in their crazy lives (including many people trying to kill and silence them and their allies) led to the body of Julie Mao, a former operative for the OPA rebel group, who was exposed to a deadly alien organism. In fact, the entire space station they were on was being used as an experiment by forces unknown to test out this “protomolecule” at the expense of thousands of lives. Luckily, Miller, Holden, and the remaining crew of “The Rocinante” spaceship were able to escape (as they had done all through the first season) and now they join forces with Fred Johnson — an OPA leader — to get more answers. Meanwhile, politics on Earth and Mars are starting to boil over as a new troupe of Martian marines are gearing up for conflict. The plot of the show is definitely confusing (I’ve probably made a few errors even in that brief summary) but I guess that’s the price we pay for realism in sci-fi. Obviously we don’t understand all the background and the motives for all the characters, but we want to avoid the contrivance of having it all explained to us in exposition (so we have to pick up the bits and pieces where we can) — and this is all from someone who’s already read the book! I am not the number one fan of space-wars (or any war stories), and frankly it was the Cylons that kept me enjoying BSG, but I think that The Expanse‘s blend of action scene with character-driven dialogue is well-done enough to keep me interested to see how this all plays out. I’m two episodes into the second season (so I’m not quite caught up) but things are really getting interesting.

magicians2The Magicians

The show quickly left behind its Harry Potter comparisons in season one, as its Hogwarts-for-grown-ups storyline gave way to the darker plot of defeating The Beast. Our snipey band of grad-school wizards found themselves shockingly betrayed by one of their own friends/allies as they were gearing up to defeat the “big bad”. Julia shook hands with The Beast in order to get his help to take revenge on an evil trickster god who had raped her and killed her friends. Now the rest of the gang is camped out in Fillory (the Narnia-esque magic realm of this series) preparing to once again face The Beast and Julia. I enjoy some of these Fillory story elements more than the Brakebills stuff. It’s fun to take a deeper look at this broad, magical world. Unsurprisingly, nothing is as innocent as you’d expect. The fictional Fillory books were supposed to be children’s books but the world is not a children’s world — this show is always quick to remind us of that. Unfortunately, I didn’t like the first book that this show is based upon, so I didn’t read any further. Now that we’re in season two I have no idea where the story is heading. Hopefully that will make it even more fun for me. I’ve only watched two episodes of this season so far, but I’m still enjoying it.

p04dgb66Planet Earth II

Finally, I wanted to make brief mention of the latest nature show which proves that even the BBC is not immune to sequel fever. Coming 10 years after its landmark series that brought us some incredible and unique images of nature (I’m still not over those unbelievable crystal caves!), Planet Earth II just started airing in North America (though it’s already long-finished in the UK). In the first episode, there was lots of amazing footage from various islands around the world, including a remote volcanic island near Antarctica where again we get to see the insane lengths to which penguins go to in order to feed their chicks. The visuals are, of course, breathtaking and I look forward to seeing what other wonders the rest of the series holds.

Even as I write this, new shows are popping up (including the HBO series Big Little Lies, created by David E. Kelly (of The Practice) and featuring amazing stars like Nicole Kidman, Reese Witherspoon, and Alexander Skarsgard; Also The Good Fight — the sequel series to The Good Wife) and I cannot keep up, but it’s never a dull moment on TV now, is it?

New Year, New TV 2017

Streaming has really changed the way we watch TV, and what would have (over the last few years) been considered “midseason” — I.e. the time when networks bring out new/returning shows to replace the ones that have already been cancelled or taken an early break — is now a bit more free-flowing. Netflix (and other streaming sites) have no real concept of “seasons”, but perhaps for competitive reasons they are releasing a bunch of new series at midseason. While there was barely enough time to fit a bunch of new pilot episodes, now I can barely catch my breath when 13 or so episodes per show are being dropped in my lap at a time. All that is just to excuse myself for only having watched one or two episodes of many of these new shows even when they look promising and exciting. Too much of a good thing, y’know?

sherlock-s4

Sherlock, season 4

This is the only returning show in this post (though given how infrequently the episodes come out, it might as well be new — Am I right?) Nevertheless, it is always great to get new episodes of this amazing detective show (for those of you who don’t know, this is a modern take on the original Arthur Conan Doyle literary creation, starring Benedict Cumberbatch as Sherlock Holmes — now hurry up and watch all the back episodes!). I’ve only watched the first episode of this season (even though by now all 3 episodes will have aired). In this episode (“The Six Thatchers”) the case in question, which concerns a mysterious body found incinerated in a car fire, is only the stepping stone to another mystery around why someone is breaking into homes and stealing plaster busts of Margaret Thatcher. Cumberbatch shines as usual in the title role. There’s more exploration of the story behind John Watson’s wife, Mary, who had previously been revealed as a kind of super-agent. The episode was really good, and hit its usual marks with an unfortunate twist at the end that will affect the relationships on the show. Apparently they are also introducing a new villain to the series, even though Sherlock is constantly looking for clues that Moriarty is back somehow. I really can’t decide whether I wish there were more episodes of this show, or if I savour the few that we get even more because they are so rare. Well, it’s not as if I get a say either way. I’ll just have to really enjoy the remaining episodes.

emerald-1482142290-screen-shot-2016-12-19-at-101127

Emerald City

This show is based on the original novels by L. Frank Baum but puts an even more epic fantasy spin on the story than ever. Think of it as Wizard of Oz by way of Game of Thrones. Directed by Tarsem Singh (who also directed the feature films Immortals, The Cell, and Mirror Mirror, with a similar flamboyance and flair). The scenery is breathtaking, with amazing mountains and old castles. The interiors are decadent and luxurious, and the costumes are lavish and beautiful. The visuals give the fantastical world a much grander scope (and it doesn’t hurt to have colossal statutes guarding the city ports). Other reviews have commented on how this series is great to look at but the story is nothing special. I have to kind of agree so far — I’ve watched only the first two episodes. Dorothy (who is a strong-willed adult nurse) has landed in this enchanted land courtesy of a tornado, and she’s already been joined by a dog called Toto, and met a straw-covered man hanging by the roadside (who she’s calling Lucas, but we all know he’s the Scarecrow). She accidentally collided with the witch of the east when she arrived (the cop car that Dorothy hijacked plowed into her, but that’s not actually how she died). In reinventions like this series, we viewers like to keep an eye out for how classic characters and story elements have been modified, and we judge their cleverness. I’d say this version gets a high score for cleverness (the yellow brick road is a cobblestone path through the mountains whose colour is caused by the poppy pollen that falls on it), but I also don’t find that it really matters that this was based on The Wizard of Oz. Surprisingly I have often lost myself in the details and forgotten about that part. I’m just enjoying it as an epic fantasy tale that’s great to watch.

one-day-at-a-time

One Day At A Time

With this show, Netflix is doing a reinvention of a 70s sitcom rather than a classic fantasy novel. It follows the original premise of a divorced mom trying to make a life for her family (I didn’t really watch the 70s version, so I don’t know how much has been carried over). In this version, the mom, Penelope, is a Cuban-American (played by Justina Machado) who had been an army nurse in Afghanistan. She works in a small clinic and lives in an apartment with her teenage daughter and son, along with her mother Lydia (played by Rita Moreno). I think the main characters are all well written and well acted, and Moreno as Lydia steals every scene — she’s just amazing. As far as clever reinventions go, the theme song is also great. It’s a reworking of the original “This Is It” infused with an energetic dose of salsa (courtesy of Gloria Estefan) — I’m humming it my head right now! Like the original show, the new version deals with some pretty serious socio-cultural issues in a heartfelt and humorous way. It’s got a bit of that old-school, optimistic, family sitcom flavour, but a fresh perspective as well (I even learned a bit about Cuban culture). Thanks to Netflix, I’ve binge-watched this whole series of 13 episodes already (and I’m going for round 2).

a-series-of-unfortunate-1766_xl

A Series of Unfortunate Events

Another reinvention, this time a series of kids books (which had been made into a movie featuring Jim Carrey) is now a new Netflix show starring Neil Patrick Harris. The story is told of three orphan children whose parents are killed when their home burns down. Violet Beaudelaire, her brother Klaus, and infant sister Sunny are sent to live with their guardian, Count Olaf (played by Harris) who hatches villainous schemes to get his hands on the Beaudelaire family fortune. Just like in the books, the stories are far-fetched but enjoyable, with a definite tongue-in-cheek tone. The tone is one of the best things about the show. Similar to the short-lived TV series Pushing Daisies, and many a Wes Anderson film (like The Grand Budapest Hotel), there’s a kind of turn-of-the-century (20th century, that is), Victorian-dollhouse kind of aesthetic, along with a prim and wordy style of narration — sorry if this isn’t clear, but you’ll definitely know what I mean when you see or hear it. The series has a lot of fun, as these clever orphans try to get themselves out of all kinds of predicaments, mostly concocted by the villainous Count Olaf. Harris is dastardly delightful in the role, and he even sings a theme song with different lyrics each episode to recap the plot so far. I’m not sure which part I enjoy more: the clever tricks, the quirky characters, the look and feel of the visuals, or the mysterious conspiracy and subplots that are brewing beneath the main story. That’s not to mention a sardonically dry narration given on-screen by the resonant voice of David Puddy from Seinfeld, Patrick Warburton — who here plays Lemony Snicket, the ostensible yet mysterious author of these stories. I think this show is great, and another all-ages winner for Netflix.

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Troll Hunters

Netflix is on a roll in the kids department, also having debuted Troll Hunters in December. This animated series comes from nerd-visionary director Guillermo Del Toro (who also directed Pan’s Labyrinth, Hellboy, and Pacific Rim). It’s set in what appears to be a modern suburb, where your average school kids attend classes complete with chubby best friends, tough guy bullies, dreamy potential girlfriends, plus school plays and gym locker rooms. However, previously unnoticed in the shadows, is a world of trolls (no, not the ugly dolls with the crazy hair) but gargoyle-like creatures with multiple eyes, arms, and fangs. They may all look scary, but some are actually good (while others definitely aren’t). One night when a heroic troll hunter battles an evil troll, he gets destroyed, leaving behind a magical amulet which seeks out a new troll hunter and instead finds a young human kid named Jim. Being the new chosen, Jim (voiced by Anton Yelchin, RIP) is now hunted himself by an evil troll named Bular (voiced by Ron Perlman). Jim doesn’t really know what’s going on, and he’s busy just trying to grow up and get on with his life, but he gets help from a couple of other friendly trolls, including Blinky (voiced by Kelsey Grammar). Two episodes in, I wouldn’t say that Troll Hunters is not ground-breaking kids fantasy, but it’s pretty well-animated, and the voice talent is top-notch. However, I suspect that the story is going to pick up; and kids can always use more fantastical shows.

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The OA

Speaking of fantastical shows, one new Netflix show that is not for kids (probably more because they wouldn’t understand what is going on than any other reason) is The OA. This series came out of nowhere to unexpectedly surprise Netflix subscribers. I’ve only watched the first episode but (even though I’ve read that there’s a disappointing ending) I am hooked. Partially it’s all the mysterious questions about this woman who is caught on video jumping off a bridge only to survive and be identified as Prairie, a woman from a small suburban town who went missing seven years prior. She also used to be blind, but somehow is able to see now. What’s more, she calls herself “the OA” (whatever that means). Her behaviour and the clues about her just keep getting stranger (She’s kind of like a grown up version of Eleven from Stranger Things) as she gets a bunch of local teens to help her perform some kind of ritual. That’s when things really change. While I love a good, quasi-sci-fi mystery, I also love the crazy way this show played with the story line in the first episode. We spend about 40 minutes in this kind of suburban wasteland where we think the story is going to be about Prairie trying to reintegrate and remember what happened to her, and where she starts to bond with a psychopathic delinquent named Steve, then “Wham!” we take a narrative left turn and the opening credits begin on a very different type of episode. I don’t want to spoil much for anyone who has not yet watched, but that switch really caught me off guard and made me want to watch all the more. The show has a strong indie-film vibe, and Britt Marling (who is one of the show’s creator and plays the OA) is also known for roles in those kinds of films. I’m hoping that the rest of the series won’t be too disappointing, but the opening is a lot to live up to.

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Beyond

This series is slightly not as weird as The OA, but it also features a main character trying to reintegrate with the community after a long mysterious absence. Holden Matthews wakes up from a 12 year com, returns to his family and tries to recover a normal life. Unfortunately, there are many things that are odd about his situation, not the least of which are the shadowy men who are after him, his very surreal dreams of people he may have known during his coma (yep, you read that right) and not to mention his thunderous super-powers. This show is released on Freeform in the US, so it’s meant for young adults or teens. That target demographic kind of shows in the way the episodes are written. Poor Holden is confused and lost in a crowd of adults and family who keep telling him what to think and do. The people who may have some answers may not be trustworthy (including his best friend Kevin) and people who have answers never find the time to explain things to him. Unfortunately, a lot of the dramatic tension and suspense would probably unravel if the characters actually reacted like normal people. One example that struck me as odd: when Holden’s brother takes him to a college party, he loses control of his powers while unconscious in the bathroom. He causes the place to burn down and they escape without anyone suspecting Holden’s involvement. However, the next morning, after she hears about the incident on the news, Holden’s mother asks him if any of his friends were involved with the incident. Besides the fact that he just woke from a long coma and has no friends, why would she ask him about this completely unrelated incident for no reason if it were not just some kind of plot device to try to build a little suspense (“Does Mom know it was me?” wonders Holden. Whatever.) To top it all off, the plot moves in fits and starts, with a lot of action, then tons of slow moving scenes of interaction where we don’t really learn anything about the characters or the plot. I thought this show had some promise, but after two episodes, I’m already getting tired of it.

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Taboo

Lastly, this is a show that I cannot really make sense of, but which has totally grabbed me by its style, its tone and its uniqueness (and which I will attempt to describe). Tom Hardy (movie actor from films such as Inception, and many others where he plays a brooding English bruiser) again plays to type as James Delaney, a man thought dead by his family and friends, who actually went to Africa during the turn of the 19th century. When his father dies, he returns to England to claim his inheritance — a small, worthless strip of land in on the west coast of North America called Nootka Sound. Apparently not every mystery is revealed because the East India Company is also very interested in this land and had made a deal with Delaney’s half-sister and her husband to acquire it before he returned from the dead. Oh, and by the way, he claims to be in love with her (I know! Lannister much?!), but thankfully the two of them did not do the deed next to their father’s casket like a couple of (yup) Lannisters. (One more little GOT connection is that Delaney’s sister is played by Oona Chaplin, last seen getting killed along with her unborn child, King-in-the-North husband, and mother-in-law at the famously ill-fated Red Wedding.) The visual style of Taboo is really interesting. It’s clearly not set in Jane Austen’s England, but rather one that is full of mud and dirt and where everyone wears black all the time (not to mention the many stove-pipe hats). The characters, especially Delaney, speak in a kind of epic melodrama kind of way. Also the characters are all very clever and scheming and baring their teeth behind their smiles (or frowns). I don’t know where this series will go (Are we headed to Nootka Sound?) but I’m keen to find out.

Streaming TV (especially Netflix) has dwarfed the networks at midseason in keeping TV fresh by bringing out a whole bunch of interesting series. There are a few more coming that I’m excited for, including APB, about a tech billionaire who uses his money to supe-up the local police with hi-tech gadgetry, and I might try The Young Pope, where Jude Law apparently plays a power-hungry and corrupt young pontiff.

So much to watch, so little time!

Fall TV 2016 Wave 2

I’m enjoying the new fall TV season so far. There’s nothing that I absolutely can’t miss, but a number of shows are still intriguing enough that I want to keep watching.

New Shows

westworldWestworld

At the top of the list of new shows worth sticking with is definitely Westworld. Hype has pegged this to be HBO’s successor to Game of Thrones, which kind of baffles me because the shows are nothing alike. From a business point of view, I guess this is another series that can cross over from the nerd population to be a general audience hit. The show is a bit cryptic with regard to what it’s really about. On the surface, we seem to be watching the operation of a Western-themed sci-fi pleasure-planet populated with artificial people (which are called “hosts”), who service the needs of the guests. There is some kind of glitching going on with some of the hosts, but it’s not totally clear what the problem is. Also, so far we’ve been introduced to several guests, including Ed Harris as a man who has been playing Westworld’s game so long that he’s now looking for “the next level” — and leaving a trail of bodies behind him. There are a lot of puzzling things going on, with a nicely gradual reveal. Apart from the amazing cinematography and scenery, there is also an excellent cast to keep us interested until we get our answers. Anthony Hopkins plays the world’s creator, Jeffrey Wright plays one of his top successors. Evan Rachel Wood, James Marsden, Thandie Newton all play host characters. Not since Lost has a series like this held so many mysteries. (4 out of 5)

american-housewifeAmerican Housewife

I feel like we’ve got a bit of a formula going on, with a fancy neighbourhood where our quirky family doesn’t really fit (they’re on the poorer end of the earning spectrum) and they like to look down on the hoity-toity neighbours. Despite that, I was drawn to the show by Katy Mixon (who played Molly’s younger sister on Mike & Molly). While the first episode contained way too much voiceover narration, I like Mixon’s sassy persona. The rest of the family and other characters will need to develop. I don’t love that the youngest daughter has some kind of anxiety disorder (the trend to have a token mentally or physically-challenged kid on every family sitcom is a tricky one). However, the two other kids seem to be poached straight from 80s hit Family Ties, but rather than it being a reaction to the parents’ hippy philosophy, the son being a self-centred money-focused conservative, and the daughter being pretty yet potentially-shallow are all blamed on the family being in an affluent neighbourhood. This show has potential, but it’s got to find itself and its characters without simply being a battle of stereotypes. (3.5 out of 5)

timeless-1152x759_jpg_1003x0_crop_q85Timeless

This is the only one of the several time-travel themed shows of the season that I decided to give a chance, mainly because early reviews were quite positive. The premise is that a villain has stolen a time machine and is using it to go back to key moments in history to destabilize and destroy present-day America. The present-day US government recruits a historian (played by Abigail Spencer, from Suits), a soldier (played by Matt Lanter), and a scientist (played by Malcolm Barrett, who I remember from Better Off Ted) to go back (using a smaller, prototype time machine) to prevent the villain from wrecking the timeline and the country’s history. It’s an interesting premise that begs the question of whether history will be changed in this show (or if it will always be saved — boring!). They answered that in the very first episode when Spencer’s character Lucy Preston returned from their first mission to find that her mother was no longer ill, and her sister never existed. So kudos to the show for not taking the easy way out and making sure that everything stays the same despite messing with the past. However, after two episodes, the sci-fi geek in me feels that they are still dealing well enough with the kind of large-scale consequences that should occur from the actions that the team has taken in the past in an attempt to prevent changes. If there is truly a butterfly effect, then every time they come back to the present, the world should have changed substantially. Now, I acknowledge that taking such a serious approach doesn’t necessarily make for a fun show, but this show does take itself seriously (It’s not like we’re remaking Quantum Leap) and that’s part of the problem. (3 out of 5)

kims-convenience-5Kim’s Convenience

I am very excited to see another Asian-centred show on North American TV. This CBC sitcom, about a Korean family who runs a convenience store in urban Toronto, is actually based on a very successful play (which I did see) and stars an actor, Paul Sun-Hyung Lee, that I actually went to university with (we shared a class, but I’m sure he’s forgotten me, so that’s enough of the name-dropping). Lee plays Appa, the patriarch and store owner. Even from the first episode, there is already some backstory to this family as Appa and his son Jung are not on speaking terms. Umma (the mother) and daughter Janet make various attempts to mend the rift, but Asian male pride is still a thing (and there is baggage between all members of the family). Despite dealing with some emotional issues that make this show more of a dramedy than a ha-ha comedy, there are still a number of funny aspects, most often stemming from the east-meets-west clash of the parents’ personalities with expected North American behaviour. As much as I enjoyed the first two episodes, a few things still kind of irked me — I’m probably harder on this show because I am also Asian and have given these kinds of issues more thought. First, I found it distracting to have immigrants speaking broken English when they are by themselves. Sure, no one wants to watch a show full of subtitles, but I am convinced that in real life Appa and Umma would be speaking Korean to each other, not English. Second, I found the title/theme of the first episode (“Gay Discount”) kind of surprising. I would have expected a new sitcom to keep things simple, and establish the main characters and their situation before jumping into socio-political topics like LGBT rights and community. Granted, Canadian shows like to quickly establish how progressive we believe we are in this country. Still, those are minor quibbles, and overall I quite enjoyed the show. (3.5 out of 5)

Returning Shows

the-flash-season-3-episode-2-jay-garrickThe Flash

We pick up this season from where we left off. Flash has altered history (There’s that theme again!) so that his mother was not killed by the Reverse-Flash. That made his family life a little more perfect, but then he starts to notice all kinds of other inconsistencies in the timeline resulting from his actions. Events hit a breaking point that leads him to make the tough decision to undo his own changes to the past, and allow his mother to be killed. Unfortunately things do not work out so cleanly, and are not restored to where they were exactly and Flash continues to deal with the consequences. Based on a storyline from the original comic book, these “Flashpoint” episodes don’t play out as successfully as they might on paper. For starters, the universe of the TV show is way smaller, so it’s almost like playing “spot the difference” to realize how the current timeline is “wrong”. To make things worse, it’s not always clear whether the change is a good or bad thing — at least until we are told that things are bad (maybe someone dies or gets hurt), which necessitates a change to the timeline. A new villain (Dr. Alchemy) has been introduced, who seems to have some mysterious abilities and a totally unknown agenda. It’s too early to know whether he will make a cool enemy or not. (3 out of 5)

supergirl-season-2-trailer-supermanSupergirl

The end of the first season seemed very open, without much of a suspenseful cliffhanger. Kara and James are now free to pursue a romantic relationship, and Kara has received a genie’s wish from Kat Grant to choose whatever job she wants. The storylines did not compellingly lead into this season, but what has been driving the season so far has been the presence of Supergirl’s cousin, Superman (played by Teen Wolf‘s Tyler Hoechlin). Having run into each other while preventing a space shuttle crash, Superman decides to hang out with his cousin and stop a new menace together. Hoechlin does a pretty good version of Superman as well as Clark Kent, and ends up inspiring Kara to become a journalist too (lame!). Sadly I’m struggling to find my interest in this show again now that most of the drama of her career and personal life, as well as the enemies that came from her own family history, have been kind of resolved. I hope they do something to rev this show up again, because I don’t think ol’ Supes can stay on indefinitely. (3 out of 5)

Fresh Off The Boat

This other sitcom I like with a mainly Asian cast (No, not you, Dr. Ken — it will never be you!), came back with a pretty fun episode: the Huangs go back to Taiwan. I loved how they played with the fish-out-of-water idea (since the kids have not ever been to Taiwan). Again, it bothered me that almost everyone was speaking English, even in Taiwan — come on! However, it was a pretty good storyline that put the focus back on their culture (rather than a generic, colour-blind, family sitcom scenario). I especially liked how they came to realize that their home is the US and not Taiwan (a classic tension for immigrant families). I hope they really get to explore the kids more this season and give them a chance to grow — especially the younger boys. Plus, it will give them more opportunities for nostalgic “growing up Asian in North America” kinds of storylines — which I relate to, and consider the best aspect of this show. (3.5 out of 5)

That’s it for the start of the fall TV season. I realize there are still more shows coming and returning (I’m looking forward to Jane the Virgin), and Netflix has a number of shows waiting to be unleashed over the next months (I cannot wait for Black Mirror. I might do a special post just for those. We’ll see.) With a schedule full of new episodes, I guess it’s just time to keep watching and to decide which ones to stick with and which ones to let go.