Rogue One: A Star Wars Story – Movie Review

rogue6-xxlarge_transcwvra147zcynwgnsprk1xwk-qyyao4e-i8v8-xkbjn4Despite being a big fan of the Star Wars universe, I wasn’t really dying to see Rogue One as much as I should have been. Nevertheless, I’m glad that I watched this really fun movie this week. As others have said, it’s the prequel movie that we’ve been waiting for. For starters, this story is related much more directly to the events of the original Star Wars movie (aka Episode 4: A New Hope). We find out what went into getting those Death Star plans to the rebels that we see in that first movie. (Even more satisfyingly, we finally understand why it was so easy to blow up the Death Star with a single shot!) Even though we are mostly introduced to new characters that we have not seen in previous movies or stories, the context is very familiar. There are glossy-white storm troopers all around; you always need to get past an alien guy to see the human that you want to talk to; and everyone dresses in distressed leather with desert scarves like they just came off a dusty jeep ride. Even our heroes and their rag-tag band are echoes to previous movies: spunky female Jyn Erso (played by Felicity Jones) is clearly cut from the Leia/Amidala/Rey cloth; rebel captain Cassian Andor (played by Diego Luna) has a definite Han/Poe vibe; and K-2SO (voiced by Alan Tudyk) fills our snarky C3-PO role with a better sense of humour (sorry, no cute wordless droid this time). Even though there are a lot of classic tropes in this movie, compared to The Force Awakens, Rogue One feels a lot more fresh and not like we’re watching another rehash of the seminal Star Wars story.

I really like the idea that not only does this movie fill in some back-story about how the rebels were able to get the plans to the Death Star, but also that it expands the world of the first movie in a very reasonable way. Despite the intimately connected cast of characters, as the title supposedly indicates, Star Wars is telling a war story. So, like in any war, there are many struggles and conflicts, with so much at stake, and so many lives affected, that there should be no end of perspectives to be shared and stories to be told. It’s great that they finally decided to tell one of the other ones. Jyn is the daughter of Galen Erso (played by Mads Mikkelson), a scientist/engineer who is forced at gunpoint to abandon his family to serve the evil empire and build the Death Star. On the eve of the empire’s launching of the Death Star super-weapon, Jyn is brought back into the picture when a runaway imperial pilot brings a secret message from Galen to Saw Gerrera (played maniacally by Forest Whitaker), a rebel extremist leader, which was meant for her. To prove her father is not evil, Jyn needs to rally some rebel aid (and along the way, gathers some rag-tag allies) to secure plans for the Death Star in order to help them destroy the weapon.

Considering so many things in this movie have been done before, it’s difficult to pinpoint what makes it so enjoyable. Obviously, the visuals are top-notch; from the opening scenes in the breath-taking mountainous landscapes where Jyn was born, to the eventual beaches on the planet Scarif where they fight the empire. Also, the many aliens and space-battles are always a CGI thrill. While on the topic of CGI, recreating the period of the first movie obviously provided a few challenges to the Rogue One team. It’s great that they kept a lot of the aesthetics of the Death Star interiors (with the displays and dials that seemed modern back in the 70s, but still look alright even today) from the first movie. However, what was more of an elaborate, nostalgic effort was the digital recreation of Grand Moff Tarkin (the imperial governor who commanded the Death Star). The actor, Peter Cushing, who played the character in the first movie passed away over 20 years ago. Lucasfilm used some of their latest effects from Industrial Light and Magic to recreate him and it’s actually pretty amazing. I mean, we still haven’t gotten to the point where we can’t tell the difference between actual actor and digital stand-in, but it’s pretty close. It was a little distracting because you can’t help looking closely for signs of artificiality (I’m still not quite sure what’s actually missing, but there’s definitely something), but they made a really good effort. Some viewers have complained a bit about how (like in every prequel) this movie suffers from the need to throw in cameos from the classic cast — while some make meaningful appearances, others do not.

Nevertheless, with all the attention to detail, I think in the end I was most drawn to the new characters. I really liked Jyn and Cassian. I believed in their cause and with their crew they became the underdogs that really had very little chance against an overwhelming force — but they had (as the movie keeps reminding us) hope. Also, the side-characters were wonderful as well — including Asian characters in the Star Wars universe (though one of them is still kind of relegated to doing martial arts) — way to represent, guys! If you felt kind of meh about The Force Awakens, give Rogue One a try. It might revive some of the excitement you have felt in the past for the Star Wars franchise. Plus it’s an exciting sci-fi adventure in its own right. (4.5 out of 5).

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